NEWS

NYPA Activates Peak Load Program On Second Day This Week; New York City Customers to Cut Demand by Over 50,000 Kilowatts

Contact
Michael Saltzman
914-390-8181
michael.saltzman@nypa.gov

July 3, 2002

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NEW YORK—For the second consecutive day, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) has activated its Peak Load Management (PLM) program to help reduce power use during peak demand hours, from 11 a.m. through 5 p.m.  The action will cut electricity consumption in New York City by more than 50,000 kilowatts, or an amount equal to the output of a small power plant.

NYPA customers participating in the PLM program, including New York City government, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the City and State Universities of New York and Salomon Smith Barney, receive $40 for each kilowatt of electricity they commit to save during the high-demand summer months.  The Power Authority may make cutback requests for up to 15 weekdays during those months.   

In addition to today and yesterday, the Authority activated the program two days last week. 

PLM participants achieve the power cutbacks by implementing energy-saving measures such as turning off or adjusting non-essential appliances and using their own generators.

The New York Power Authority’s Peak Load Management program is part of a statewide effort to reduce the demand for electricity. The New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), the New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), and the State Public Service Commission (PSC) are coordinating efforts to sustain the reliability of New York State’s electricity supplies during the peak demand periods caused by summer heat.

In addition to the more than 50,000 kilowatts of demand reduction from NYPA’s New York City customers enrolled in the Peak Load Management Program, NYPA has enlisted its customers throughout the state to commit to more than 360,000 kilowatts of energy reductions under separate contract arrangements or though NYISO demand reduction programs.