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Multi-Year Maintenance Project Starts on Water Intake Structures for Niagara Power Project

Contact:
Lou Paonessa
716-286-6651
Lou.Paonessa@nypa.gov

January 25, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

LEWISTON—The first of three phases has begun in a multi-year maintenance and rehabilitation project on the water intake structures for the New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) Niagara Power Project. The structures divert water from the Niagara River to the Niagara Project for hydropower production.

Workers from Hohl Industrial Company, located in Buffalo, began hanging nylon safety netting over the exterior of the two intake structures on Jan 23. The work will enable the examination and repair of various components and the netting will remain in place for the entire project.

International Chimney, also located in Buffalo, will work on phase two of the project, scheduled to begin later this year. Internal building components of the intake structures will be assessed and rehabilitated as needed. For the third phase, NYPA is expected to issue bids shortly for the rehabilitation of the exterior covering of the structures. Work on that phase is estimated to begin in 2009 and last for about two years.

The gates within the intake structures open and close as needed to allow water flow from the Niagara River, through underground conduits, to the forebay at the Niagara Power project almost five miles away. The structures are located on the Niagara River two and one-half miles upstream from Niagara Falls. They are 55 feet wide and nearly 100 feet high, and are visible from the Niagara River and Robert Moses Parkway.

About NYPA:

■    NYPA uses no tax money or state credit.  It finances its operations through the sale of bonds and revenues earned in large part through sales of electricity.  ■    NYPA is a leader in promoting energy-efficiency, new energy technologies and electric transportation initiatives.  ■    It is the nation’s largest state-owned electric utility, with 18 generating facilities in various parts of the state and more than 1,400 circuit-miles of transmission lines.

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